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Great article regarding stress. For me I recognized the negative impacts of it long ago. I made some serious adjustments and it has helped me considerably since then. Some of the adjustments I made were easier than others. Many of them have probably been life savers.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/08/well/mind/stress-can-make-you-sick-take-steps-to-reduce-it.html?fallback=0&recId=1S4Y6l4OlG49LoIPEQdmf50i4nj&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=NC&recAlloc=control&geoCountry=US&blockId=home-discovery-vi-prg&imp_id=769824573&action=click&module=Discovery&pgtype=Homepage

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A good article - TFP.

It says: "Dr. Chatterjee, .... believes the role of stress in chronic disease is far too often overlooked. He estimates that 80 percent of the problems he sees in his clinic — conditions like high blood pressure, insomnia, depression, metabolic disease and weight gain — are in some way related to stress."

I can certainly relate to that. I've lost count of the number of my ailments I have researched and found a cause has been stress. My GP should be very grateful to Dr. Google! 🙂

 

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2 minutes ago, Bazle said:

A good article - TFP.

It says: "Dr. Chatterjee, .... believes the role of stress in chronic disease is far too often overlooked. He estimates that 80 percent of the problems he sees in his clinic — conditions like high blood pressure, insomnia, depression, metabolic disease and weight gain — are in some way related to stress."

I can certainly relate to that. I've lost count of the number of my ailments I have researched and found a cause has been stress. My GP should be very grateful to Dr. Google! 🙂

 

Spot on.  I remember posting something in this sense on a thread gere about medication.  Search the root of the problem, and attack THAT. Don't simply treat the symptons.

 

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48 minutes ago, Bazle said:

A good article - TFP.

It says: "Dr. Chatterjee, .... believes the role of stress in chronic disease is far too often overlooked. He estimates that 80 percent of the problems he sees in his clinic — conditions like high blood pressure, insomnia, depression, metabolic disease and weight gain — are in some way related to stress."

I can certainly relate to that. I've lost count of the number of my ailments I have researched and found a cause has been stress. My GP should be very grateful to Dr. Google! 🙂

 

It is indeed, so much of it i can relate to.

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46 minutes ago, Thai Spice said:

  Search the root of the problem, and attack THAT. Don't simply treat the symptons.

Bingo

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5 hours ago, Pumpuynarak said:

Bingo

Double bingo. Not always easy though. But if you make positive changes a priority and overcome the excuse making (although sometimes beyond reasonable control), and be willing to make changes (sacrifices) you can accomplish a great deal to decrease and/or minimize stress.

Focus

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When we were cavemen we were constantly under stress from not being able to eat, hunt, find water, getting eaten by wild animals
We are perfectly capable of dealing with it.

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I went for a job interview about 20 years ago at a British Aerospace maintenance facility in Bristol.

I was interviewed first by a crew chief engineer with whom I got on really well.Then the young HR guy started asking me questions like "How do you deal with stress?"

I said I play darts & snooker & work out & go running but I'd always had a reputation for being laid back & didn't think I got that stressed.

Wrong answer,they obviously didn't want someone who didn't get stressed.Which was ok as I'd already decided I didn't want to work there anyway.

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3 hours ago, misteregg said:

When we were cavemen we were constantly under stress from not being able to eat, hunt, find water, getting eaten by wild animals
We are perfectly capable of dealing with it.

just how old are you

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1 minute ago, misteregg said:


Old enough to read history books!

ok those paper things. you are old.

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1 hour ago, coxyhog said:

I went for a job interview about 20 years ago at a British Aerospace maintenance facility in Bristol.

I was interviewed first by a crew chief engineer with whom I got on really well.Then the young HR guy started asking me questions like "How do you deal with stress?"

I said I play darts & snooker & work out & go running but I'd always had a reputation for being laid back & didn't think I got that stressed.

Wrong answer,they obviously didn't want someone who didn't get stressed.Which was ok as I'd already decided I didn't want to work there anyway.

It's a very big thing in my line of work, will always be asked at an interview. 

As you're dealing with some very damaged, very complex and traumatised individuals, so there is a high 'burn out' rate if you don't have good support and strategies. 

We have regular structured Clinical Supervision, and it's also 'on tap' if needed.

Edited by Krapow
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3 minutes ago, Krapow said:

It's a very big thing in my line of work, will always be asked at an interview. 

As you're dealing with some very damaged, very complex and traumatised individuals, so there is a high 'burn out' rate if you don't have good support and strategies. 

We have regular stretchered Clinical Supervision, and it's also 'on tap' if needed.

The thing with aircraft maintenance is that whenever one is on the ground it's not making money.We have to do a human factors course every 2 years to get reminded that if you work long & very unsocial hours in a pressurised environment then you are likely to make mistakes.It's total bollocks & in my opinion it's so that if you do f**k up & there's an incident then the company can say well we told him.

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1 minute ago, coxyhog said:

The thing with aircraft maintenance is that whenever one is on the ground it's not making money.We have to do a human factors course every 2 years to get reminded that if you work long & very unsocial hours in a pressurised environment then you are likely to make mistakes.It's total bollocks & in my opinion it's so that if you do f**k up & there's an incident then the company can say well we told him.

That's not too far from the truth me thinks, the company has an obligation to make sure that you are aware of the risks and it ticks that box legally too!

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There's a lot of compulsory training that is nothing more than a company covering it's a**e.

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So being married to a Thai should be banned for every aircraft engineer! ☺️

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1 hour ago, coxyhog said:

It can be quite stressful being married to a Thai....

The reverse with me TBH, been such a calming influence.

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For sure work can play a big part of it, 10 years or so ago, they took one of my co-workers out by ambulance, he was shaking rather violently and many of us thought perhaps he was a " diabetic" or something. No, he was stressed out from trying to reach these goals and objectives that he was told needed to be done. 

Not good. 

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1 hour ago, Bazle said:

So being married to a Thai should be banned for every aircraft engineer! ☺️

It was said very tongue in cheek.

My breakfast is always on the table whatever time I come down the stairs & she's always asking me what I want for dinner the day before.Always very supportive of me wherever I've worked.Probably the most stressful time for me was when she was in hospital having two abdominal operations....I guess that says a lot.

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5 hours ago, Yessongs said:

For sure work can play a big part of it, 10 years or so ago, they took one of my co-workers out by ambulance, he was shaking rather violently and many of us thought perhaps he was a " diabetic" or something. No, he was stressed out from trying to reach these goals and objectives that he was told needed to be done. 

Not good. 

Too much stress can lead to panic and anxiety attacks. Been there, done that. Not nice at all and wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy... Russell Brand accepted! 

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8 hours ago, Bazle said:

So being married to a Thai should be banned for every aircraft engineer! ☺️

only is she flys

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I attribute my high blood pressure to stress in the States. (mostly job related) I am on two different meds for my high BP. A good reading in the States ranges from 130-135 over 90ish with meds. This past summer while I spent a few months in Thailand, I decided to do an experiment. I stopped taking my BP meds for 7 days. (possibly dangerous I know) So, on the 7th day I went to the hospital and had my BP checked. It was 117 over 78. I found that to be very interesting. 

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