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United B777 uncontained engine failure


coxyhog
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52 minutes ago, Pillow Biter said:

Poor sob who had that window seat 😅

I’m no aviation expert, but last Saturday flying into Montreal l think we had a near catastrophe for over speeding on the A220. We had started our descent from 39,000, flight was my fastest ever on that route, and I glanced at the screen, seeing we were going 670mph, when the Max I had seen was 600ish. Got a seatbelt warning, and was bloody scared for a few seconds, felt different than turbulence, like the brakes were on but with Max throttle. He descended quite a bit before the speed dropped, then all good. 
Then I’m all set to land, he continued East 20 miles, which shocked me with airports being empty. Maybe wanted to be back into a headwind? 
Anyway I’ve not been so nervous flying the last decade or so, but that event got the heart racing. 3:37 YYC YUL, with 40 miles of circling around, is an insane time

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Boeing recommend suspending operations of all 777s fitted with P&W 4000-112 engines.

"While [an] investigation is ongoing, we recommended suspending operations of the 69 in-service and 59 in-storage 777 aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engines," the company said in a statement.

............................................................

The agency (FAA) has ordered extra inspections of Boeing 777 jets fitted with the Pratt & Whitney 4000 engine following the incident. "We reviewed all available safety data following [Saturday's] incident," said FAA administrator Steve Dickson in a statement.

"Based on the initial information, we concluded that the inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of engine, used solely on Boeing 777 airplanes."

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1 hour ago, Freee!! said:

True, they used to use duct tape, taping a duck isn't much use.

I have always known it as Duck tape, so you got me thnking. This is what I discovered :-

Why do they call duck tape duct tape?
 
''Duct tape was first invented by a female factory worker during World War II. It was originally called 'duck' tape because it was made out of a cotton duck fabric and it repelled water like a duck's back. Duck Brand duct tapes are made with three main components: rubber adhesive, cloth, and film backing''
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42 minutes ago, boydeste said:

I have always known it as Duck tape, so you got me thnking. This is what I discovered :-

Why do they call duck tape duct tape?
 
''Duct tape was first invented by a female factory worker during World War II. It was originally called 'duck' tape because it was made out of a cotton duck fabric and it repelled water like a duck's back. Duck Brand duct tapes are made with three main components: rubber adhesive, cloth, and film backing''

Nice one, I have different sources, let's agree to disagree.

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12 minutes ago, Freee!! said:

Nice one, I have different sources, let's agree to disagree.

I wasn't worried about trying to defend my corner, it wouldn't be the first time I had called something different to the norm during my 40 years of engineering. :default_fun:

The youngsters under me used to call it gaffer tape, I just assumed that was because it was what I often used for temporary repairs. 🤣

Edited by boydeste
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4 minutes ago, boydeste said:

I wasn't worried about trying to defend my corner, it wouldn't be the first time I had called something different to the norm during my 40 years of engineering. :default_fun:

I wasn't worried either, I just looked it up before posting (the first one) as English isn't my mother tongue.

 

EDIT:

About languages, what happened to the flags?

Edited by Freee!!
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On 2/22/2021 at 6:53 PM, bob lt said:

Boeing recommend suspending operations of all 777s fitted with P&W 4000-112 engines.

"While [an] investigation is ongoing, we recommended suspending operations of the 69 in-service and 59 in-storage 777 aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engines," the company said in a statement.

............................................................

The agency (FAA) has ordered extra inspections of Boeing 777 jets fitted with the Pratt & Whitney 4000 engine following the incident. "We reviewed all available safety data following [Saturday's] incident," said FAA administrator Steve Dickson in a statement.

"Based on the initial information, we concluded that the inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of engine, used solely on Boeing 777 airplanes."

I just happened to be watching a U-Tube video yesterday of this problem happening before with Pratt & Whitney engines on the earliest  version of the  Boeing 777.

The Airline concerned (cannot remember which one) were instructed to carry out ultrasonic(?) tests on all their 777 aircraft engines but it was only discovered that they never did so when exactly the same problem happened again.

Both aircraft survived without loss of life with the flight crew in my opinion doing a brilliant job in getting the aircraft back on the ground. That did not stop the Captain in  one of the incidents from being criticized in the subsequent action report for taking just 44 seconds to turn the remaining engine off after he had he had initiated the evacuation procedures.

Edited by Jambo
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