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SPACEX Starship build / progression


Chappo

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Does anyone follow the SPACEX starship build and progression? - they launched and landed a 50m rocket today (SN10) - blew up a few mins later, but to be able to watch the iterative progression of what will be the next spaceship to take us to the moon, mars and beyond. 

I have watched from the start ::) - there are quite a few facebook groups dedicated to it, along with many youtube channels.

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I had watched the video of the landing, but it finished before the explosion. Hadn't realized it had dismantled itself spectacularly until reading your post. Did notice it landed slightly off center on the pad, and looked like there was a bit of a tilt to the vehicle. Here's the video of the launch and landing.

And the video of its dismantling.

 

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1 hour ago, forcebwithu said:

IMHO, the most impressive landing was the twin landing of the Flacon Heavy in 2018. What an impressive feat of engineering that was.

 

that was the most spectacular space moment ever

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...
16 minutes ago, Stillearly said:

Just turned it on and it looks like a Bitcoin scam ... 555

Saw that as well. What I think has happened is Musk is only using X and the SpaceX website to broadcast the launch. Some great video on their website stream which is what I've been watching. They're now at T + 15 minutes into the launch and Starship is now in orbit and coasting for the next 30 minutes.

https://www.spacex.com/launches/mission/?missionId=starship-flight-3

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18 minutes ago, forcebwithu said:

They've lost telemetry which means there's a good chance they lost Starship during reentry.

Burned up on reentry? Can't they see

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Noticeable during reentry while they still had a video signal was a fair amount debris sluffing off. Video cued to start at that point. What's remarkable is the HD video of the ship beginning to hit atmosphere and the resulting plasma generated.

BTW, Scott Manley's channel is a very good channel for info having to do with space flights.

 

Edited by forcebwithu
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9 hours ago, forcebwithu said:

Over the Indian Ocean, so no eyes on the sky there.

I thought there were eyes everywhere, but i suppose oceans are an obvious exception.

You would think that protecting against the heat of reentry would be complex but known engineering. It's just friction isn't it, and the forces are huge generating the heat.

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14 hours ago, Zambo said:

I thought there were eyes everywhere, but i suppose oceans are an obvious exception.

You would think that protecting against the heat of reentry would be complex but known engineering. It's just friction isn't it, and the forces are huge generating the heat.

I think the engineering challenge with Starship is controlling the huge mass of the ship so it's properly oriented for reentry. From Manley's video it looks like they never had full control of the ship as it started to hit the upper fringes of atmosphere. Still it's remarkable how far SpaceX has come over the last decade.

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1 hour ago, forcebwithu said:

I think the engineering challenge with Starship is controlling the huge mass of the ship so it's properly oriented for reentry. From Manley's video it looks like they never had full control of the ship as it started to hit the upper fringes of atmosphere. Still it's remarkable how far SpaceX has come over the last decade.

Flight technology has advanced a huge amount in 60 years. It seems precision is probably more critical and less margin for error is built in now.

I read:

Rapid progress is needed for Starship, which is on the critical path for NASA's Artemis 3 mission. Artemis 3 aims to land the first humans on the moon since the end of the Apollo era in the early 1970s. Artemis 3 is currently scheduled for 2026, giving Starship less than two years to meet NASA vehicle qualifications for landing astronauts on the lunar surface.

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  • 2 months later...

They made it to splash down in the Indian Ocean. Some incredible live views from onboard Starship as it reentered. An amazing view of one of the forward flaps as it was destroyed piece by piece from plasma. At the very end the view from the remaining camera with a cracked and debris filled lens you could barely make out part of the flap still intact and maneuvering to control the attitude of the ship.

Just amazing how far SpaceX has come in such a short amount of time.

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Derek Dangleberries said:

Bloody Hell.. missed that bit too !!!

You can replay the live stream and jump forward to the good bits.

Here's a screen grab of what remained of the forward flap just before splashdown. It makes for a great watch, knowing no one was harmed in the making of, of the flap coming apart during reentry.

Edited to add: Actually it's amazing this much of the flap survived after seeing the pieces flying off earlier.

image.jpeg

Edited by forcebwithu
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Just now, forcebwithu said:

You can replay the live stream and jump forward to the good bits.

Here's a screen grab of what remained of the forward flap just before splashdown. It makes for a great watch, knowing no one was harmed in the making of, of the flap coming apart during reentry.

image.jpeg

 

Yes mate .. just done that ... Thanks for the link !

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A good analysis of the flight by Scott Manley. Video queued up to start at the point when you see the material of the flap starting to melt away.

A credit to the engineers and the software guys/gals on designing and building a spaceship that adapted to changing conditions and still managed a soft splash down.

Best quote from Scott, "... while this is disintegrating, while this is breaking up, it is still maintaining control, it is stricken, but it is continuing. It's like Anakin Skywalker flying half a spaceship."

 

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