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The One Letter You Never Want To Get ...


Evil Penevil
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Johnson 27832-054_1-page-001.jpg

Cory Johnson was executed on Jan. 14, 2021, for killing seven people in 1992 as a drug dealer in Virginia.  In his final words, he apologized to the families of his victims.  He also noted the pizza and strawberry shake he'd gotten as his last meal had been "wonderful," but complained he hadn't been given the jelly-filled donuts he'd asked for.

Evil

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13 hours ago, Krapow said:

Indeed, that's why i said in certain circumstances.

Until you can give me a 100% guarantee no innocent will ever be executed again, I will remain against. Additionally, properly done an executions is a quick and easy way out, which the truly guilty just don't deserve. About the only thing in favour of the death penalty I can think of is that it reduces recidivism.

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On 4/13/2021 at 8:01 PM, Evil Penevil said:

Johnson 27832-054_1-page-001.jpg

Cory Johnson was executed on Jan. 14, 2020, for killing seven people in 1992 as a drug dealer in Virginia.  In his final words, he apologized to the families of his victims.  He also noted the pizza and strawberry shake he'd gotten as his last meal had been "wonderful," but complained he hadn't been given the jelly-filled donuts he'd asked for.

Evil

Well according to the date of the letter and the date of the execution you gave, forget the Jelly donuts, I think I’d be more pissed at someone in the postal service for sending my execution warrant to me 11 months after I was dead. 😉

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On 4/13/2021 at 4:35 PM, Freee!! said:

I am against the death sentence because mistakes are made and too many innocents have been convicted.

Name the last man in the US who was convicted of a capital offense and put to death for being found guilty of his crime, or crimes.

This multiple murderer lived 29 years after taking the lives of 7 innocent people. Should have happened within a few years of being convicted, that still leaves plenty of time for any defense motions for an appeal of the sentence, or a new trial.

The death penalty is no deterrent for heinous crimes when the punishment might take a generation, or more, to finally happen.

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6 minutes ago, Mr. Smooth said:

 

The death penalty is no deterrent for heinous crimes when the punishment might take a generation, or more, to finally happen.

Bet these guys were happy that the sentence takes a while to happen ...

https://innocenceproject.org/the-innocent-and-the-death-penalty/

Eighteen people have been proven innocent and exonerated by DNA testing in the United States after serving time on death row. They were convicted in 11 states and served a combined 229 years in prison – including 202 years on death row – for crimes they didn’t commit.

 

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4 minutes ago, Stillearly said:

Bet these guys were happy that the sentence takes a while to happen ...

https://innocenceproject.org/the-innocent-and-the-death-penalty/

Eighteen people have been proven innocent and exonerated by DNA testing in the United States after serving time on death row. They were convicted in 11 states and served a combined 229 years in prison – including 202 years on death row – for crimes they didn’t commit.

 

Well, that's not OK in Smoothies book. 

According to him all 18 should have been executed within 3 years of sentencing. 😏

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19 minutes ago, Stillearly said:

Bet these guys were happy that the sentence takes a while to happen ...

https://innocenceproject.org/the-innocent-and-the-death-penalty/

Eighteen people have been proven innocent and exonerated by DNA testing in the United States after serving time on death row. They were convicted in 11 states and served a combined 229 years in prison – including 202 years on death row – for crimes they didn’t commit.

 

In other words, NO ONE, particularly in the last 25 years, has been put to death for being wrongly convicted by the state. DNA is still relatively new, and it's great that forensic science has advanced to the point where these types of things are standard in the investigation of a crime where it is pertinent to the guilt or innocence of the accused.

As far as the post from the OP, that's not the case here. The convicted drug dealer receiving the letter of his execution being convicted of murdering 7 people, you can reasonably conclude that a weapon of some kind was used to kill these people. In addition, it was stated that he apologized to the families of his victims.

No need for DNA to clear this guy.

As I wrote, he should have been room temp a few years after his guilty verdict.

 

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29 minutes ago, Kathmandu said:

Well, that's not OK in Smoothies book. 

According to him all 18 should have been executed within 3 years of sentencing. 😏

Read it again Kat. It was applying to this particular case. You really do get much too excited to respond before fully comprehending exactly what you are responding too.

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21 minutes ago, Mr. Smooth said:

In other words, NO ONE, particularly in the last 25 years, has been put to death for being wrongly convicted by the state. DNA is still relatively new, and it's great that forensic science has advanced to the point where these types of things are standard in the investigation of a crime where it is pertinent to the guilt or innocence of the accused.

 

 

You can't be certain about that ...the guys in the article were the ones who they helped in time ... many others probably weren't so lucky 

 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Smooth said:

Read it again Kat. It was applying to this particular case. You really do get much too excited to respond before fully comprehending exactly what you are responding too.

 

1 hour ago, Mr. Smooth said:

Should have happened within a few years of being convicted,

And you are an idiot. 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Smooth said:

Read it again Kat. It was applying to this particular case. You really do get much too excited to respond before fully comprehending exactly what you are responding too.

Where is Krapow when you need him, or indeed Alias or Ivan the idiot. Lol.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Looks like they possibly executed an innocent man...

4 Years After an Execution, a Different Man’s DNA Is Found on the Murder Weapon
Lawyers’ request to conduct additional DNA testing before Ledell Lee was executed had been denied.

For 22 years, Ledell Lee maintained that he had been wrongly convicted of murder.

“My dying words will always be, as it has been, ‘I am an innocent man,’” he told the BBC in an interview published on April 19, 2017 — the day before officials in Arkansas administered the lethal injection.

Four years later, lawyers affiliated with the Innocence Project and the American Civil Liberties Union say DNA testing has revealed that genetic material on the murder weapon — which was never previously tested — in fact belongs to another man. In a highly unusual development for a case in which a person has already been convicted and executed, the new genetic profile has been uploaded to a national criminal database in an attempt to identify the mystery man...

... According to the Innocence Project, no physical evidence was ever produced that connected Mr. Lee to Ms. Reese’s murder. In a summary of the case, the group also outlined obstacles that Mr. Lee had faced over the years, including a lawyer who was drunk and unprepared at court hearings, unreliable neighborhood eyewitnesses and conflicts of interest for key players.

Mr. Lee’s first trial resulted in a hung jury. His second murder trial began on Oct. 10, 1995, just seven days after O.J. Simpson had been acquitted of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman...

... Along with providing new DNA results, Ms. Young’s petition pushed the city of Jacksonville to compare fingerprints from the crime scene to a state and national fingerprint database for the first time. It has long been established that Mr. Lee’s fingerprints did not match any of those at the scene.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/07/us/ledell-lee-dna-testing-arkansas.html

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On 4/15/2021 at 12:46 AM, Mr. Smooth said:

In other words, NO ONE, particularly in the last 25 years, has been put to death for being wrongly convicted by the state. DNA is still relatively new, and it's great that forensic science has advanced to the point where these types of things are standard in the investigation of a crime where it is pertinent to the guilt or innocence of the accused.

As far as the post from the OP, that's not the case here. The convicted drug dealer receiving the letter of his execution being convicted of murdering 7 people, you can reasonably conclude that a weapon of some kind was used to kill these people. In addition, it was stated that he apologized to the families of his victims.

No need for DNA to clear this guy.

As I wrote, he should have been room temp a few years after his guilty verdict.

 

🙄

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4 hours ago, lazarus said:

Looks like they possibly executed an innocent man...

4 Years After an Execution, a Different Man’s DNA Is Found on the Murder Weapon
Lawyers’ request to conduct additional DNA testing before Ledell Lee was executed had been denied.

For 22 years, Ledell Lee maintained that he had been wrongly convicted of murder.

“My dying words will always be, as it has been, ‘I am an innocent man,’” he told the BBC in an interview published on April 19, 2017 — the day before officials in Arkansas administered the lethal injection.

Four years later, lawyers affiliated with the Innocence Project and the American Civil Liberties Union say DNA testing has revealed that genetic material on the murder weapon — which was never previously tested — in fact belongs to another man. In a highly unusual development for a case in which a person has already been convicted and executed, the new genetic profile has been uploaded to a national criminal database in an attempt to identify the mystery man...

... According to the Innocence Project, no physical evidence was ever produced that connected Mr. Lee to Ms. Reese’s murder. In a summary of the case, the group also outlined obstacles that Mr. Lee had faced over the years, including a lawyer who was drunk and unprepared at court hearings, unreliable neighborhood eyewitnesses and conflicts of interest for key players.

Mr. Lee’s first trial resulted in a hung jury. His second murder trial began on Oct. 10, 1995, just seven days after O.J. Simpson had been acquitted of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman...

... Along with providing new DNA results, Ms. Young’s petition pushed the city of Jacksonville to compare fingerprints from the crime scene to a state and national fingerprint database for the first time. It has long been established that Mr. Lee’s fingerprints did not match any of those at the scene.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/07/us/ledell-lee-dna-testing-arkansas.html

Because an innocent was convicted (and executed), a murderer has gone free. As an innocent was executed murdered, who is going to be prosecuted for murder?

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7 hours ago, Freee!! said:

Because an innocent was convicted (and executed), a murderer has gone free. As an innocent was executed murdered, who is going to be prosecuted for murder?

 

It does say "possibly".

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4 hours ago, KWA said:

It does say "possibly".

As I read the article itself, there is no "possibly", only a certainty. However, even the slightest possibility is enough for me to be against capital punishment. And as far as I am concerned, those responsible for this travesty of justice should be charged with (and convicted for) premeditated homicide.

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