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Krapow

Easter

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Does it mean anything more to you than a couple of days off and chocolate?

I remember as a child we used to hard boil eggs, paint them, and my parents would take us to Slemish mountain or somewhere and we'd roll them down the hill. Never hear of it now.

Mrs Krapow asked me what is was about on her first Easter here, I explained the religious/Christian element to it as best I could remember from Sunday School (remember that?), the crucifixion and miraculous resurrection. Said with a wink and a 'if you believe that'.  :default_ball:

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I have never understood while Jesus's death and ressurection changes date every year but his birth don't.

And it varies by weeks not a day or two.

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1 minute ago, galenkia said:

I have never understood while Jesus's death and ressurection changes date every year but his birth don't.

And it varies by weeks not a day or two.

Very deep..., but cracking question 

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3 minutes ago, galenkia said:

I have never understood while Jesus's death and ressurection changes date every year but his birth don't.

And it varies by weeks not a day or two.

Moon phases and all that me thinks!

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1 minute ago, boydeste said:

Moon phases and all that me thinks!

Guess it must be due to the lunar cycle.

But his death was not in vain as it invented the modern calendar!.😀

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, galenkia said:

Guess it must be due to the lunar cycle.

But his death was not in vain as it invented the modern calendar!.😀

His birth also gave me alot of presents as a kid too!

Edited by boydeste
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2 hours ago, Krapow said:

Does it mean anything more to you than a couple of days off and chocolate?

I remember as a child we used to hard boil eggs, paint them, and my parents would take us to Slemish mountain or somewhere and we'd roll them down the hill. Never hear of it now.

Mrs Krapow asked me what is was about on her first Easter here, I explained the religious/Christian element to it as best I could remember from Sunday School (remember that?), the crucifixion and miraculous resurrection. Said with a wink and a 'if you believe that'.  :default_ball:

Paisley would not have approved of such lavish celebrations on the Holy Sabbath.

Save Ulster from Sodomy ........ :default_devil:

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1 hour ago, AJSP said:

Very deep..., but cracking question 

All this phillisophical thinking makes my head hurt.

All i usually think about is tits,motorbikes,music,books and QPR's never ending relegation battles.😀.

 

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2 hours ago, Krapow said:

Does it mean anything more to you than a couple of days off and chocolate?

I remember as a child we used to hard boil eggs, paint them, and my parents would take us to Slemish mountain or somewhere and we'd roll them down the hill. Never hear of it now.

Mrs Krapow asked me what is was about on her first Easter here, I explained the religious/Christian element to it as best I could remember from Sunday School (remember that?), the crucifixion and miraculous resurrection. Said with a wink and a 'if you believe that'.  :default_ball:

The painted egg thing we did too, Pace eggs?

I actually did this a couple of years ago for some children in our village. @Horizondave and a couple of friends came with their kids too and we had a good afternoon drinking beer while the girls and young ones decorated eggs before rolling down the drive. I brought prizes from the UK and the last one chosen was the most expensive, a bear from Hamley's toy shop in London.

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9 hours ago, Thinkingallowed said:

The painted egg thing we did too, Pace eggs?

I actually did this a couple of years ago for some children in our village. @Horizondave and a couple of friends came with their kids too and we had a good afternoon drinking beer while the girls and young ones decorated eggs before rolling down the drive. I brought prizes from the UK and the last one chosen was the most expensive, a bear from Hamley's toy shop in London.

Don't remember them being called pace eggs, just remember rolling them down a hill and tumbling down after them. 

Never hear of or see it in London anyway. 

Might have to bring Caitlin home for Easter in a few years time, join in the fun as we did as kids.

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44 minutes ago, Krapow said:

Don't remember them being called pace eggs, just remember rolling them down a hill and tumbling down after them. 

Never hear of or see it in London anyway. 

Might have to bring Caitlin home for Easter in a few years time, join in the fun as we did as kids.

Was all organised by church groups where I grew up. A place in Yorkshire I lived still did the pace egg plays on good Friday.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_Egg_play

I'm sure there's a thing in the North East of England where there knock the pointy end of the eggs together to find a winner. We did the roll down a hill one.

https://www.lavenderandlovage.com/2012/03/traditions-on-monday-traditional-easter-marbled-pace-eggs.html

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, galenkia said:

I have never understood while Jesus's death and ressurection changes date every year but his birth don't.

And it varies by weeks not a day or two.

In 325 CE, the Council of Nicaea established that Easter would be held on the first Sunday after the first Full Moon occurring on or after the vernal equinox. (*) From that point forward, the Easter date depended on the ecclesiastical approximation of March 21 for the vernal equinox.

 

So the date was decided by committee, figures.

 

 

How Is Easter Determined?

Easter falls on the first Sunday after the Full Moon date, based on mathematical calculations, that falls on or after March 21. If the Full Moon is on a Sunday, Easter is celebrated on the following Sunday.

Although Easter is liturgically related to the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere (March equinox) and the Full Moon, its date is not based on the actual astronomical date of either event.

  • March 21 is the church's date of the March equinox, regardless of the time zone, while the actual date of the equinox varies between March 19 and March 22, and the date depends on the time zone.
  • The date of the Paschal Full Moon, used to determine the date of Easter, is based on mathematical approximations following a 19-year cycle called the Metonic cycle.

Both dates may coincide with the dates of the astronomical events, but in some years, they don't.

Astronomical vs. Ecclesiastical Dates

In years in which the church's March equinox and Paschal Full Moon dates do not coincide with the astronomical dates of these events, confusion about the date of Easter can arise. In 2019, for example, the March equinox in the Western Hemisphere happened on Wednesday, March 20, while the first Full Moon in spring was on Thursday, March 21 in many time zones. If the church followed the timing of these astronomical events, Easter would have been celebrated on March 24, the Sunday after the Full Moon on March 21.

However, the Full Moon date in March specified by the church's lunar calendar, also called the ecclesiastical Full Moon, was March 20, 2019—one day before the ecclesiastical date of the March equinox, March 21. For that reason, the Easter date 2019 is based on the nextecclesiastical Full Moon, which is on April 18. This is why Easter 2019 falls on April 21.

Calendar with holidays

Earliest and Latest Easter Dates

According to the Metonic cycle, the Paschal Full Moon falls on a recurring sequence of 19 dates ranging from March 21 to April 18. Since Easter happens on the Sunday following the Paschal Full Moon, it can fall on any date between March 22 and April 25 (years 1753-2400).

https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/determining-easter-date.html

Edited by fygjam
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Think I prefer the Pagan lets all get naked and have a fertility dance.

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39 minutes ago, Krapow said:

Think I prefer the Pagan lets all get naked and have a fertility dance.

And take lots of 'shrooms.

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Easter meant chocolate eggs for my kids when they were young.

Nowadays it means two weeks off work and that's good enough for me.

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On 4/14/2019 at 1:36 PM, fygjam said:

In 325 CE, the Council of Nicaea established that Easter would be held on the first Sunday after the first Full Moon occurring on or after the vernal equinox. (*) From that point forward, the Easter date depended on the ecclesiastical approximation of March 21 for the vernal equinox.

 

So the date was decided by committee, figures.

 

 

How Is Easter Determined?

Easter falls on the first Sunday after the Full Moon date, based on mathematical calculations, that falls on or after March 21. If the Full Moon is on a Sunday, Easter is celebrated on the following Sunday.

Although Easter is liturgically related to the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere (March equinox) and the Full Moon, its date is not based on the actual astronomical date of either event.

  • March 21 is the church's date of the March equinox, regardless of the time zone, while the actual date of the equinox varies between March 19 and March 22, and the date depends on the time zone.
  • The date of the Paschal Full Moon, used to determine the date of Easter, is based on mathematical approximations following a 19-year cycle called the Metonic cycle.

Both dates may coincide with the dates of the astronomical events, but in some years, they don't.

Astronomical vs. Ecclesiastical Dates

In years in which the church's March equinox and Paschal Full Moon dates do not coincide with the astronomical dates of these events, confusion about the date of Easter can arise. In 2019, for example, the March equinox in the Western Hemisphere happened on Wednesday, March 20, while the first Full Moon in spring was on Thursday, March 21 in many time zones. If the church followed the timing of these astronomical events, Easter would have been celebrated on March 24, the Sunday after the Full Moon on March 21.

However, the Full Moon date in March specified by the church's lunar calendar, also called the ecclesiastical Full Moon, was March 20, 2019—one day before the ecclesiastical date of the March equinox, March 21. For that reason, the Easter date 2019 is based on the nextecclesiastical Full Moon, which is on April 18. This is why Easter 2019 falls on April 21.

Calendar with holidays

Earliest and Latest Easter Dates

According to the Metonic cycle, the Paschal Full Moon falls on a recurring sequence of 19 dates ranging from March 21 to April 18. Since Easter happens on the Sunday following the Paschal Full Moon, it can fall on any date between March 22 and April 25 (years 1753-2400).

https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/determining-easter-date.html

Thanks, saved me a lot of typing. One small addendum though: The above only goes for the Roman Catholic Church and the protestant churches of western and central Europe, including the Czechoslovak Hussite Church. There are other calculations for the Eastern European Orthodox churches and Judaic Pesach, which are all supposed to follow the same rule.

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3 minutes ago, Freee!! said:

Thanks, saved me a lot of typing. One small addendum though: The above only goes for the Roman Catholic Church and the protestant churches of western and central Europe, including the Czechoslovak Hussite Church. There are other calculations for the Eastern European Orthodox churches and Judaic Pesach, which are all supposed to follow the same rule.

Wait till the EU find out about that ! That need to be regulated !

 

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1 minute ago, Thai Spice said:

Wait till the EU find out about that ! That need to be regulated !

But it is regulated. It is religious, so important enough to leave it out of the hands of politicians.

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14 minutes ago, Krapow said:

Off now to Wed, thanks JC!

He died for our long weekend .. two weeks off school for the kids ..and as much chocolate as you can eat 🙂 

 

5EED9646-8359-4CD1-B586-D7A4742A86CC.jpeg

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