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Anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar


coxyhog
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I remember visiting Gibraltar and finding a cemetary where some of the Royal Navy sailors who died at Trafalgar are buried.

Seeing the headstones and reading the words engraved I found very moving.

download.jpg                     Traf 3.jpg                                                Traf.jpg                                   

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A lot of military defeats are widely remembered.  Every year the U.S. commemorates those killed and wounded in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor:

Pearl-Harbor.jpg

 

The Battle of the Alamo and the Battle of the Little Bighorn were two famous "last stands" that are far more discussed to this day than many, many victories.  Pickett's Charge on the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, a disasterous defeat for the Confederacy, is the single most written-about military event in U.S. history.

Evil

Edited by Evil Penevil
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9 hours ago, Freee!! said:

I'd say the Battle of the Little Bighorn is infamous, not famous. And Custer got what he deserved after disobeying orders.

Custer made some very bad mistakes that led to the annihilation of the five companies of the 7th Cavalry under his direct command that day.  Basically, he - and the entire U.S. command, including Generals Crook, Gibbon and Terry- underestimated the size of the Souix, Cheyenne and Arapaho forces opposing the cavalry.  Custer split the 700 men of the 7th Cavalry into four units to attack a village he thought consisted of 800 "hostiles," which would have meant 200 to 260 warriors.  In fact, there were 1,500 to 2,500 warriors, maybe even more.  Custer and the roughly 200 men in the five companies he commanded were caught in the open and wiped out within 30 minutes.

It's unlikely Custer would have ordered an attack on the village had he known its true size.  His arrogance in not properly scouting the village before the attack resulted in the deaths of 260 officers and men of the  7th Cavalry Regiment.  The entire regiment was not wiped out; only the five companies under Custer's personal command.

Evil

Edited by Evil Penevil
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9 hours ago, Evil Penevil said:

Custer made some very bad mistakes that led to the annihilation of the five companies of the 7th Cavalry under his direct command that day.  Basically, he - and the entire U.S. command, including Generals Crook, Gibbon and Terry- underestimated the size of the Souix, Cheyenne and Arapaho forces opposing the cavalry.  Custer split the 700 men of the 7th Cavalry into four units to attack a village he thought consisted of 800 "hostiles," which would have meant 200 to 260 warriors.  In fact, there were 1,500 to 2,500 warriors, maybe even more.  Custer and the roughly 200 men in the five companies he commanded were caught in the open and wiped out within 30 minutes.

It's unlikely Custer would have ordered an attack on the village had he known its true size.  His arrogance in not properly scouting the village before the attack resulted in the deaths of 260 officers and men of the  7th Cavalry Regiment.  The entire regiment was not wiped out; only the five companies under Custer's personal command.

Evil

That is what "Freee!" said but in one line. 🤣

This topic is about the anniversary on the 21st October the Battle of Trafalgar when the Royal Navy carried on our great tradition of sticking it to the frogs, this time at sea.

Onward to the next chapter - "Waterloo".

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1 hour ago, Jambo said:

That is what "Freee!" said but in one line. 🤣

This topic is about the anniversary on the 21st October the Battle of Trafalgar when the Royal Navy carried on our great tradition of sticking it to the frogs, this time at sea.

Onward to the next chapter - "Waterloo".

We always have been, we are, and I hope that we always shall be, detested in France

- Arthur Wellesley

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